HomeEventsRegisterLog in
Help my beer fund
Latest topics
Top posters
muckyman
 
CANNER
 
sengoksa
 
cujoway
 
dorito777
 
_KLEO_
 
Firsty
 
Sinsinety
 
PapaLazarou
 
MikeyT68
 
Navigation
 Portal
 Index
 Memberlist
 Profile
 FAQ
 Search
Search
 
 

Display results as :
 
Rechercher Advanced Search

Share | 
 

 Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
2litre
quake God
quake God
avatar

Posts : 306
Join date : 2015-07-21

PostSubject: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:14 pm

Americans! Learn how the language is spoken!
Back to top Go down
2litre
quake God
quake God
avatar

Posts : 306
Join date : 2015-07-21

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:19 pm

Need stuff like:
Fancy a dander? 
Hell dare ya!
Wha ir yae?
'A cannae explain maesel, A’m feart, Sir,” said Alice, “baecaas A’m naw maesel, yae see.'
Back to top Go down
muckyman
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 4510
Join date : 2009-11-14
Age : 51
Location : Hull UK

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:55 am

Pikeys..

_________________
Back to top Go down
http://themuckyplace.forumotion.com
NuclearDiarrhea
quake God
quake God
avatar

Posts : 194
Join date : 2014-01-21
Age : 30
Location : USA

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:46 pm

Interesting accent lol Very Happy

To go along with another accent, I was wondering the other day how we got the common "Pirate" accent. Like when you imitate a pirate, you know how to talk like one. But WHERE did this cliche come from?? I always thought it was Irish sounding but I had to look it up for myself. This is what I found:

(From http://dialectblog.com/2011/05/24/pirate-accent/)



Ask people to imitate a pirate, and they instinctually adopt the “pirate accent” immortalized in film and television. This unique brogue is renowned for it’s strong “r” sound, as in “yarrr” and “arrrrr.”


Pirate imitators may wonder, “What accent am I doing? Some kinda Irish?”

The classic “pirate dialect,” in fact, is not Irish, but rather a crude imitation of the slightly similar West Country English (the dialects of Southwest England)*. Why do fictional pirates always speak in this accent? Here’s the standard explanation: During the Golden Age of Piracy, in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, many English pirates came from this region. Look up famous seadogs from the era, and you’ll find birthplaces in Bristol, Devon, and Cornwall. Mystery solved, right?

Not so fast. The golden age of piracy ended by the mid-eighteenth century. How can we collectively remember how these men spoke? And how can everyday people approximate the accent of 18th-century English pirates with such surprising verisimilitude?

I can only think of one explanation. At some point in time, some actor must have needed to play one of these pirates. Upon discovering that his pirate character was from the West Country, he decided to use the appropriate accent. And somehow this convention must have spread.

But where, and when, did this convention originate? My experience suggests the pirate brogue emerged as a dramatic staple in the 20th-Century. As a child, I was a huge fan of early pirate flicks like Treasure Island (1934) and Errol Flynn’s Captain Blood, and I don’t recall any West Country accents in those films. So perhaps it was a later phenomenon.

With this in mind, I decided to do some research on the matter. I think I may have stumbled upon a possible culprit for the Pirate accent, thanks to the website of Bonaventure, a British maritime re-enactment group:

Quote :
Long John Silver lived in Bristol, England, supposedly the birthplace of Edward Teach, Blackbeard. In the early 1950s Disney produced films of “Treasure Island” (1950) and “Blackbeard the Pirate”(1952), and the same actor was used to play Silver and Teach – Robert Newton. Newton then reprised his role of Long John Silver for “Long John Silver” (1954) and the TV series “The adventures of Long John Silver (1955). Robert Newton was born and raised in Dorset, not far from Bristol, so he knew the West Country accent which Silver and Teach would have spoken in very well, and used it in those films.
If Disney had perhaps not cast Newton, is it possible the pirate accent would have never entered the popular consciousness?

As usual, I welcome alternate theories.
Back to top Go down
http://www.soundcloud.com/danschreib
CANNER
Moderator
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 3410
Join date : 2013-04-30

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Tue Oct 20, 2015 10:38 am

Nice read.


Modernday pirates talk french, but that sounds a lot less piraty. Suspect
Back to top Go down
NuclearDiarrhea
quake God
quake God
avatar

Posts : 194
Join date : 2014-01-21
Age : 30
Location : USA

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Wed Oct 21, 2015 1:14 am

Hehe. I don't know how pirates are imitated in Europe, but over here we tend to use this sort of rough Irish accent when imitating them. Language is really interesting. I came across this also yesterday. I never knew this language existed:
Back to top Go down
http://www.soundcloud.com/danschreib
CANNER
Moderator
Moderator
avatar

Posts : 3410
Join date : 2013-04-30

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Wed Oct 21, 2015 12:27 pm

Seen a documentary about that whistling language on Discovery once. Quite funny, though might be a bit awkward in the local supermarket. And would a bird ever try to join in on the whisteling conversation. Surprised 

Here in Europe we also use the classic pirate voice for imitating a pirate. In fact it is used so much you'ld almost forget there are also other countries with pirates that don't speak english. With modernday pirates I was referring to these guys:

Back to top Go down
NuclearDiarrhea
quake God
quake God
avatar

Posts : 194
Join date : 2014-01-21
Age : 30
Location : USA

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Thu Oct 22, 2015 10:52 pm

Ahh yeah the Somalian pirates! That is one pathetic ship!

lol!
Back to top Go down
http://www.soundcloud.com/danschreib
2litre
quake God
quake God
avatar

Posts : 306
Join date : 2015-07-21

PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   Mon Oct 26, 2015 1:48 pm

very ulstersh, very yankee
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.   

Back to top Go down
 
Ulster accent. Pretty interesting.
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Too Lovely, too much Pretty, Heaven!!
» An Interesting Theory/thelostmarketingploy
» Interesting topic on netmums RE Kates book
» OP is a pretty cool guy and doesn't afraid of anything
» Possible Scenarios/Interesting Comments

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: Gadgets and Tech-
Jump to: